Abigail A. Baird

Professor of Psychological Science on the Arnhold Family Chair

Professor Baird’s research examines the brain and behavioral basis of adolescent development. Her work examines the ways in which social, emotional, cognitive, and brain-based factors drive the processes by which adolescents become adults. The long-term goal of this work is to better identify and prevent psychopathology; and further to inform legal and educational policy.

BA, Vassar College; MA, Boston University; MA, PhD, Harvard University
At Vassar since 2006

Contact

845-437-7723
New England Building
Box 53

Courses

PSYC 105 Introduction to Psychological Science
PSYC 243 Topics in Physiological Psychology
STS 303 Senior Thesis

Selected Publications

Baird, A.A., Roellke, E.V., & Zeifman, D. M. (2017). “Alone and adrift: The association between mass school shootings, school size, and student support.” The Social Science Journal, 54, 1-10.

Baird, A. A. & Roellke, E. V. (2015). “Girl Uninterrupted: The neural basis of moral development among adolescent females,” in Decety, J. & Wheatley, T. (Eds.) The Moral Brain: A Multidisciplinary Perspective. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Baird, A.A., Barrow, C.L., Richard, M.K. (2012). “Juvenile neuroLaw: When it’s good it is very good indeed, and when it's bad it’s horrid.” Journal of Health Care Law and Policy, 15(1), 15-35.

Baird, A.A., Silver, S.H., & Veague, H.B. (2010). “Cognitive control reduces sensitivity to relational aggression among adolescent girls.” Social Neuroscience, 5(5-6), 519–532.

In the Media

Professor of Psychological Science Abigail Baird speaks with BBC Radio about the possibility of lowering the voting age in England.

An Albuquerque Journal story examined a study co-authored by Abigail Baird ’91, Professor of Psychological Science; Emma Roellke ’16; and Debra Zeifman, Professor of Psychological Science, about the link between school shootings and large schools.

A paper published in the Social Science Journal, co-authored by Abigail Baird ’91, Professor of Psychological Science; Emma Roellke ’16; and Debra Zeifman, Professor of Psychological Science, about the link between school shootings and large schools, was mentioned in a Morning Call story.